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CRITICAL THINKING 2

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Dear Teacher,

Welcome to the page of Critical Thinking Test Items.

Dear colleague,

On this page you'll find :

1. Critical Thinking definitions and  teaching

2. Critical Thinking tests online

3. Critical Reading  test items

4. More Definitins, Teaching strategies, Tutorials,

Resources and Assessment at the end of this page.

===================================================

We make a distinction here between Critical Reading test items

 and Critical Thinking test items.

We present here samples of Critical Thinking  test items and Critical Reading test items in addition to various Language skills testing techniques. For Training  and Background Material and Lists of Critical Thinking Skills, Go to our

Critical Thinking page

http://www.angelfire.com/super2/abdallah_education/critical_thinking/


Free Critical Thinking Tests online

http://www.insightassessment.com/SampleTest1.html

Reasoning and Critical Thinking skill online sample

test with explanations

http://www.insightassessment.com/Sample%20Test2.html

Reasoning motivation and disposition items

http://www.testingthinking.com/thinking/ns/

Primary level Tests are free online (requires registration)

http://tsa.ucles.org.uk/about.html

free short Critical thinking test and  a 50-item

longer critical test (requires JavaScript)

with a downloadable Answer Key

http://www.wwc.edu/2632.0.html

Sample of California Critical Thinking Skills Test

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/about/sat/reading.html

SAT Reasoning Test samples ( includes

sentence completion and Passage-based reading)

http://www.4tests.com/exams/questions.asp?exid=6449563&googlebot=6

SAT Critical reading 1 (25 questions) and SAT

Critical reading 2 (25 questions)

http://www.pimahb.se/web3/indexeng.html

Five personality online tests (requires registration)

===========================================

Teaching Critical Thinking

http://www.skepdic.com/refuge/ctlessons.html

Critical Thinking lessons

http://www.austhink.org/critical/pages/definitions.html

Definitions of Critical Thinking

http://www.austhink.org/critical/pages/critical_reading_and_writing.html

Teaching Critical Thinking and writing

http://academic.pg.cc.md.us/~wpeirce/MCCCTR/ttol.html

Strategies for teaching thinking

http://www.fallacyfiles.org/

Examples of unlogical reasoning

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_thinking

Critical thinking definition and history

===================================================

Critical Thinking

Skill: Identifying Cause/ Result

Sentence level

Underline the  clause that shows an effect in the following sentences:

a.      I broke my  bicycle, so now I need a new one.

b.     I can't buy a new PC today because I  can't afford to.

=============================

Skill: Identifying Cause/ Result

Sentence level

Complete the following sentences with  a logical clause:

a.      Our car didn't work in the morning; as a result, -------------------.

b.     If TV programs were more interesting, ----------------------------.

c.     -------------------------------------, consequently, the headmaster told us to go home.

Skill: Detecting bias

Sentence level

Write  balanced or biased on the space provided before each sentence below  according to your evaluation of the expressed point of view.

  1. ------ Some people seldom read newspapers.
  2. ------ All newspaper readers are well-informed.
  3. ------ Many TV viewers feel that cartoon films are interesting.
  4. ------ All newspaper news are true.
  5. ------ Watching the news on TV is a silly waste of time.
  6. ------ Some people rarely watch TV news.
  7. ------ The events in drama films are always true.
  8. ------ Perhaps the popularity of films on DVDs made cinemas less popular.
  9. ------ Newspaper editors do not always tell us the truth.

  

 =================================================

Skill: Drawing inferences

Short text level

The following item was quoted from:

Stanley, Nancy.(1984), The Best TOEFL Test Book, Addison-Wesley

 Publishing Company, Reading, Massachchusetts,USA.

Read the texts  below and answer the questions that follow. Your answers should be based on the texts.

"Los Angeles, host of the 1932 and 1984 Olympics, was  founded in 1781, though the oldest house still standing in the city goes back to only 1818. Unlike San Francisco, it was mainly settled by people who traversed the United states by land.

It may be inferred from the text that:

a.      The early settlers of San Francisco reached it by land.

b.     No houses were built in Los Angeles between 1781 and 1818.

c.     A few buildings in Los Angeles are more than 200 years old.

d.     There are no eighteenth-century buildings in Los Angeles."

Skill: Drawing inferences

Short text level

What makes this a joke?

'An estate agent's assistant, whose job was to write advertisements for houses for sale, wrote a proposal of marriage to the girl in the office upstaires, -O Eth.wi.y.mry.me? Lf.wd.be.wrthls.wtht.y.'

a.      He has mis-spelled it all.

b.     He has used the spellings for advertisements for an unusual purpose.

c.     He could easily have spoken to her.

d.     He must be illiterate.

Skill: Drawing Conclusions

Short text level

The following item was quoted from:

Stanley, Nancy.(1984), The Best TOEFL Test Book, Addison-Wesley

 Publishing Company, Reading, Massachchusetts,USA.

Read the paragraph below, then write Reasonable or Not Reasonable on the space before each statement.

Fadi walked quickly into the living room as he entered the house. He could hardly see anything.  No one was there, but he felt the presence of someone else. As he reached for the phone to call the police, the room lit up and voices shouted, "Surprise!"

a.      -------------- Someone is committing a burglary.

b.     -------------- Someone is moving into a new house.

c.     -------------- Someone is giving a party.

d.     -------------- The lights are off as the story begins.

e.      -------------- The phone isn't working.

==============================================

Skill: Drawing inferences

Short text level

"Recent research into whether people who are good at solving brain twisters are more intelligent than those who are not suggests that the "experts" make use of a special type of insight. However, not only do they appear to be good at this (choosing which elements to process, to combine or to compare from the information given), but they are clever at making use of  " general"  or prior knowledge and at monitoring their own progress with a particular problem. In addition, they appear capable of adopting an appropriate  cognitive style consisting of a combination of impulse and reflection. Just what this combination is  still mystifies the researchers, and so does the original question, to which their answer is a somewhat frustrating  "possibly'.

What is the best title for this text?

a.      The Nature of Intelligence

b.     Are Brain Twisters Tests of  Intelligence? Doubt Stays

c.     Brain Twisters; How Everyone Can Solve Them

d.     The Cognitive Style  of Brain-Twister Writers

Which of the following may not be inferred  from the text?

    1. Experts at brain twisters use different talents from non-experts
    2. There are several factors affecting success with brain twisters.
    3. Both impulsive and reflective thinking play a role in soving brain twisters.
    4. The researchers were frustrated by brain twisters
  1. What does the author seem to feel about the research?

a.      Selectively interested

b.     Interested but in partial agreement

c.     Interested but somewhat dissatisfied

d.     Interested but completely puzzled"

Skill: Checking validity of claims

Text level

The following item was quoted from:

Phillips, Terry et al, (1996), AMRA: Advanced English

(Language), Student's Book. Ministry of Education, Amman, Jordan.

Text 1

The folowing text is an advertisement.

Where is your car NOW?

 With CAR FINDER you’ll always know-even when it’s stolen!

   Car theft is rising in Britain. Park your car somewhere and when you come back, it’s gone. You’re not even safe parking outside your own house. Do you know where your car is now? Are you sure? Now comes CAR FINDER -- the latest invention which ensures that you know where your car is every minute of the day. It finds your car quickly, so it’s more likely that it will come back in one piece! And you won’t have to spend a fortune on hiring cars either.

   CAR FINDER, endorsed by the police and promoted by the British Car Club, is the 21st-century solution to a growing problem of the 1990s. It is based on a system which has already proven effective in Japan, where police reports show that 96% of all stolen cars fitted with this system were recoverd-- many of them in under an hour. And an added bonus--Japanese police say they caught the thieves with the car in 33% of cases-- ten times the national average. The powerful transmitter enables the police to pinpoint your car anywhere within a 200-mile radius of London – even when hidden in a garage.

   But my car’s insured, you say. Why do I need to worry? Ask some of the victims  who have had their cars stolen. There’re thousands of them about! Firstly, you may wait weeks--sometimes months--to get the insurance money. In the meantime, you must hire a car or rely on public transport. And, what's more, when you get the money, it may not cover what you think the car was worth. Or, perhaps worst of all you may finally get the car back, badly damaged.

    With CAR FINDER you have peace of mind. Wherever you leave the car, the hidden transmitter is protecting it. And because of this extra protection, most major insurance companies offer discounts to owners of CAR FINDER—sometimes as much as 20%.

  Recovery can be expensive, so we offer a special recovery insurance which covers all the costs involved. And if you belong to BCC, you are entitled to free recovery as soon as the police have completed their inspection of the car.

   Well, a sophisticated system like this is not cheap, of course. But the expense is well worth it—especially when compared with the cost of a good car alarm system, which can, in most cases, be disabled in seconds by professional thieves.

   You must have seen one of those films where James Bond—or whoever—is following the villain's car from a distance by looking at a small radar screen. Well, CAR FINDER  works like that. A hidden transmitter sealed into the body of the car is activated when the car is stolen. It immediately begins to send  a powerful signal which can be picked up on police in-car computers. The police can track your vehicle from the moment it is taken. The transmitter goes on working for up to one month.

   All you have to do is call the number below and we will advise you of the nearest installer. He will call and give you a quote for fitting the device to your vehicle. And he can usually arrange fitting within a week.

    For more details,  phone now, free on 0800 12 34 56, quouting ref. no 81. Alternatively, write to CAR FINDER, Freepost (AB12), Newtown, Hants, RG2 3AD.

Text 2

This is an article from a UK consumer magazine about crime.

Tracking down car thieves

Theft from cars and theft of cars is a serious problem world-wide. Overall, Britain has a very bad record on car crime—the worst in Europe in fact. An epidemic, the British police have called it. Theft of cars was up 2% in England and Wales  last year and in 1993 nearly 600,000 cars were stolen—one every 52 seconds. Recorded theft of property from cars fell by 4% over the same period, but, says the Home Office, this is misleading as only one in three thefts is actually reported. It is likely therefore that this is also rising.

  A new device on the market claims to be a breakthrough in the fight against car crime. It is an electronic tracker – a new, high-tech way of recovering stolen cars.

   At around 400 dollars, the device costs considerably more than the most expensive car alarm. The company which makes the device claims the system is endorsed by the police, although the Home Office refused to confirm this. Although said to be promoters of the device, the British Car Club would only say that anything which assisted in the fight against car crime must be a good thing.

   It is claimed that the police can trace your car wherever it is hidden within 200 miles of London – hard luck if you live in Glasgow – with receivers fitted to their cars. But policemen we spoke to said few cars were equipped as yet and one said he doubted if signals would reach low-lying parts of the country which couldn't even pick up BBC radio programmes yet! Statistics from Japan are impressive, however. There the homing device would appear to have made a dramatic impact on recovery and arrest rates.

   But British insurance companies are wary. Although some give discounts for factory-fitted car alarms, we did not find any willing to give a discount for this system. As one insurer said: " This does not stop the car being stolen in the first place. Many stolen cars are damaged or written off within minutes of being stolen. We prefer better methods of preventing criminals breaking into cars and then better ways of immobilizing them so they can't be driven away."

a. Advertisements always stress the advantages of their products. That's why information in advertisements must be evaluated. Is it accurate?

Identify unsupported claims in Text 1.

Car Finder is endorsed------------.

----------------------------------.

b. Do the 'facts' from the advertisement in Text 1 check out? Find out sentences or phrases in Text 2 that are related to the claims in Text 1 .

----------" the Home Office refused to confirm this."

-----------------------------------------------------------.

========================================

Critical Reading

Critical reading questions generally ask for the following kinds  of information:

1.     the main idea of the passage.

2.     the author’s opinion or point of view.

3.     A definition of vocabulary in context.

4.     An inference from content or tone.

5.     Referential questions

6.     Inferential questions

7.     Use of cohesive devices

8.     The writer's attitude

9.     An interpretation of words or concepts.

10. In the case of more than one text, a comparison or contrast of material.

Samples:

Critical reading questions generally ask for the following kinds  of information:

1.     the main idea of the passage.

2.     the author’s opinion or point of view.

3.     A definition of vocabulary in context.

4.     An inference from content or tone.

5.     Referential questions

6.     Inferential questions

7.     Use of cohesive devices

8.     The writer's attitude

9.     An interpretation of words or concepts.

10. In the case of more than one text, a comparison or contrast of material.

Samples:

Skill: Identifying form/function of structure words

Sentence level

Draw a line under the word since when it means as and two lines when it means from time to time in the following sentences:

a.      He couldn't come out since he was doing his homework.

b.     Since I last saw you I have got a new job.

c.     Since Jane was the eldest, she looked after the others.

References

Phillips, Terry et al, (1996), AMRA: Advanced English (Language), Student's Book. Ministry of Education, Amman, Jordan.

Stanley, Nancy.(1984), The Best TOEFL Test Book, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Reading, Massachchusetts,USA

Skill: Identifying Cause/ Result

Sentence level

Underline the  clause that shows an effect in the following sentences:

a.      I broke my  bicycle, so now I need a new one.

b.     I can't buy a new PC today because I  can't afford to.

=============================

Skill: Identifying Cause/ Result

Sentence level

Complete the following sentences with  a logical clause:

a.      Our car didn't work in the morning; as a result, -------------------.

b.     If TV programs were more interesting, ----------------------------.

c.     -------------------------------------, consequently, the headmaster told us to go home.

Skill: Detecting bias

Sentence level

Write  balanced or biased on the space provided before each sentence below  according to your evaluation of the expressed point of view.

  1. ------ Some people seldom read newspapers.
  2. ------ All newspaper readers are well-informed.
  3. ------ Many TV viewers feel that cartoon films are interesting.
  4. ------ All newspaper news are true.
  5. ------ Watching the news on TV is a silly waste of time.
  6. ------ Some people rarely watch TV news.
  7. ------ The events in drama films are always true.
  8. ------ Perhaps the popularity of films on DVDs made cinemas less popular.
  9. ------ Newspaper editors do not always tell us the truth.

  

 =================================================

Skill: Drawing inferences

Short text level

The following item was quoted from:

Stanley, Nancy.(1984), The Best TOEFL Test Book, Addison-Wesley

 Publishing Company, Reading, Massachchusetts,USA.

Read the texts  below and answer the questions that follow. Your answers should be based on the texts.

"Los Angeles, host of the 1932 and 1984 Olympics, was  founded in 1781, though the oldest house still standing in the city goes back to only 1818. Unlike San Francisco, it was mainly settled by people who traversed the United states by land.

It may be inferred from the text that:

a.      The early settlers of San Francisco reached it by land.

b.     No houses were built in Los Angeles between 1781 and 1818.

c.     A few buildings in Los Angeles are more than 200 years old.

d.     There are no eighteenth-century buildings in Los Angeles."

Skill: Drawing inferences

Short text level

What makes this a joke?

'An estate agent's assistant, whose job was to write advertisements for houses for sale, wrote a proposal of marriage to the girl in the office upstaires, -O Eth.wi.y.mry.me? Lf.wd.be.wrthls.wtht.y.'

a.      He has mis-spelled it all.

b.     He has used the spellings for advertisements for an unusual purpose.

c.     He could easily have spoken to her.

d.     He must be illiterate.

Skill: Drawing Conclusions

Short text level

The following item was quoted from:

Stanley, Nancy.(1984), The Best TOEFL Test Book, Addison-Wesley

 Publishing Company, Reading, Massachchusetts,USA.

Read the paragraph below, then write Reasonable or Not Reasonable on the space before each statement.

Fadi walked quickly into the living room as he entered the house. He could hardly see anything.  No one was there, but he felt the presence of someone else. As he reached for the phone to call the police, the room lit up and voices shouted, "Surprise!"

a.      -------------- Someone is committing a burglary.

b.     -------------- Someone is moving into a new house.

c.     -------------- Someone is giving a party.

d.     -------------- The lights are off as the story begins.

e.      -------------- The phone isn't working.

==============================================

Skill: Drawing inferences

Short text level

"Recent research into whether people who are good at solving brain twisters are more intelligent than those who are not suggests that the "experts" make use of a special type of insight. However, not only do they appear to be good at this (choosing which elements to process, to combine or to compare from the information given), but they are clever at making use of  " general"  or prior knowledge and at monitoring their own progress with a particular problem. In addition, they appear capable of adopting an appropriate  cognitive style consisting of a combination of impulse and reflection. Just what this combination is  still mystifies the researchers, and so does the original question, to which their answer is a somewhat frustrating  "possibly'.

What is the best title for this text?

a.      The Nature of Intelligence

b.     Are Brain Twisters Tests of  Intelligence? Doubt Stays

c.     Brain Twisters; How Everyone Can Solve Them

d.     The Cognitive Style  of Brain-Twister Writers

Which of the following may not be inferred  from the text?

    1. Experts at brain twisters use different talents from non-experts
    2. There are several factors affecting success with brain twisters.
    3. Both impulsive and reflective thinking play a role in soving brain twisters.
    4. The researchers were frustrated by brain twisters
  1. What does the author seem to feel about the research?

a.      Selectively interested

b.     Interested but in partial agreement

c.     Interested but somewhat dissatisfied

d.     Interested but completely puzzled"

Skill: Checking validity of claims

Text level

The following item was quoted from:

Phillips, Terry et al, (1996), AMRA: Advanced English

(Language), Student's Book. Ministry of Education, Amman, Jordan.

Text 1

The folowing text is an advertisement.

Where is your car NOW?

 With CAR FINDER you’ll always know-even when it’s stolen!

   Car theft is rising in Britain. Park your car somewhere and when you come back, it’s gone. You’re not even safe parking outside your own house. Do you know where your car is now? Are you sure? Now comes CAR FINDER -- the latest invention which ensures that you know where your car is every minute of the day. It finds your car quickly, so it’s more likely that it will come back in one piece! And you won’t have to spend a fortune on hiring cars either.

   CAR FINDER, endorsed by the police and promoted by the British Car Club, is the 21st-century solution to a growing problem of the 1990s. It is based on a system which has already proven effective in Japan, where police reports show that 96% of all stolen cars fitted with this system were recoverd-- many of them in under an hour. And an added bonus--Japanese police say they caught the thieves with the car in 33% of cases-- ten times the national average. The powerful transmitter enables the police to pinpoint your car anywhere within a 200-mile radius of London – even when hidden in a garage.

   But my car’s insured, you say. Why do I need to worry? Ask some of the victims  who have had their cars stolen. There’re thousands of them about! Firstly, you may wait weeks--sometimes months--to get the insurance money. In the meantime, you must hire a car or rely on public transport. And, what's more, when you get the money, it may not cover what you think the car was worth. Or, perhaps worst of all you may finally get the car back, badly damaged.

    With CAR FINDER you have peace of mind. Wherever you leave the car, the hidden transmitter is protecting it. And because of this extra protection, most major insurance companies offer discounts to owners of CAR FINDER—sometimes as much as 20%.

  Recovery can be expensive, so we offer a special recovery insurance which covers all the costs involved. And if you belong to BCC, you are entitled to free recovery as soon as the police have completed their inspection of the car.

   Well, a sophisticated system like this is not cheap, of course. But the expense is well worth it—especially when compared with the cost of a good car alarm system, which can, in most cases, be disabled in seconds by professional thieves.

   You must have seen one of those films where James Bond—or whoever—is following the villain's car from a distance by looking at a small radar screen. Well, CAR FINDER  works like that. A hidden transmitter sealed into the body of the car is activated when the car is stolen. It immediately begins to send  a powerful signal which can be picked up on police in-car computers. The police can track your vehicle from the moment it is taken. The transmitter goes on working for up to one month.

   All you have to do is call the number below and we will advise you of the nearest installer. He will call and give you a quote for fitting the device to your vehicle. And he can usually arrange fitting within a week.

    For more details,  phone now, free on 0800 12 34 56, quouting ref. no 81. Alternatively, write to CAR FINDER, Freepost (AB12), Newtown, Hants, RG2 3AD.

Text 2

This is an article from a UK consumer magazine about crime.

Tracking down car thieves

Theft from cars and theft of cars is a serious problem world-wide. Overall, Britain has a very bad record on car crime—the worst in Europe in fact. An epidemic, the British police have called it. Theft of cars was up 2% in England and Wales  last year and in 1993 nearly 600,000 cars were stolen—one every 52 seconds. Recorded theft of property from cars fell by 4% over the same period, but, says the Home Office, this is misleading as only one in three thefts is actually reported. It is likely therefore that this is also rising.

  A new device on the market claims to be a breakthrough in the fight against car crime. It is an electronic tracker – a new, high-tech way of recovering stolen cars.

   At around 400 dollars, the device costs considerably more than the most expensive car alarm. The company which makes the device claims the system is endorsed by the police, although the Home Office refused to confirm this. Although said to be promoters of the device, the British Car Club would only say that anything which assisted in the fight against car crime must be a good thing.

   It is claimed that the police can trace your car wherever it is hidden within 200 miles of London – hard luck if you live in Glasgow – with receivers fitted to their cars. But policemen we spoke to said few cars were equipped as yet and one said he doubted if signals would reach low-lying parts of the country which couldn't even pick up BBC radio programmes yet! Statistics from Japan are impressive, however. There the homing device would appear to have made a dramatic impact on recovery and arrest rates.

   But British insurance companies are wary. Although some give discounts for factory-fitted car alarms, we did not find any willing to give a discount for this system. As one insurer said: " This does not stop the car being stolen in the first place. Many stolen cars are damaged or written off within minutes of being stolen. We prefer better methods of preventing criminals breaking into cars and then better ways of immobilizing them so they can't be driven away."

a. Advertisements always stress the advantages of their products. That's why information in advertisements must be evaluated. Is it accurate?

Identify unsupported claims in Text 1.

Car Finder is endorsed------------.

----------------------------------.

b. Do the 'facts' from the advertisement in Text 1 check out? Find out sentences or phrases in Text 2 that are related to the claims in Text 1 .

----------" the Home Office refused to confirm this."

-----------------------------------------------------------.

========================================

Critical Reading

Critical reading questions generally ask for the following kinds  of information:

1.     the main idea of the passage.

2.     the author’s opinion or point of view.

3.     A definition of vocabulary in context.

4.     An inference from content or tone.

5.     Referential questions

6.     Inferential questions

7.     Use of cohesive devices

8.     The writer's attitude

9.     An interpretation of words or concepts.

10. In the case of more than one text, a comparison or contrast of material.

Samples:

Critical reading questions generally ask for the following kinds  of information:

1.     the main idea of the passage.

2.     the author’s opinion or point of view.

3.     A definition of vocabulary in context.

4.     An inference from content or tone.

5.     Referential questions

6.     Inferential questions

7.     Use of cohesive devices

8.     The writer's attitude

9.     An interpretation of words or concepts.

10. In the case of more than one text, a comparison or contrast of material.

Samples:

Skill: Identifying form/function of structure words

Sentence level

Draw a line under the word since when it means as and two lines when it means from time to time in the following sentences:

a.      He couldn't come out since he was doing his homework.

b.     Since I last saw you I have got a new job.

c.     Since Jane was the eldest, she looked after the others.

References

Phillips, Terry et al, (1996), AMRA: Advanced English (Language), Student's Book. Ministry of Education, Amman, Jordan.

Stanley, Nancy.(1984), The Best TOEFL Test Book, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Reading, Massachchusetts,USA

=================================================


 


More Critical Thinking definitions

 

http://www.austhink.org/critical/pages/definitions.html

Definition of Crtical Thinking

http://www.insightassessment.com/dex.html

Definition of Crtical Thinking in the famous Delphi Report

http://faculty.ed.uiuc.edu/rhennis/outlinegoalsctcurassess3.html

An Outline of Goals for a Critical Thinking Curriculum

and Its Assessment  1

http://www.criticalthinking.net/SSConcCTApr3.html

A SUPER-STREAMLINED CONCEPTION OF

CRITICAL THINKING

 

Tutorials for Working on Developing

Critical Thinking

 

http://www.austhink.org/tutorials/default.htm

Argument mapping

http://online.santarosa.edu/philo/tutorial/index.html

Thinking Critically: A Tutorial

http://www.sjsu.edu/depts/itl/

Mission Critical Tutorials

http://www.wwnorton.com/logictutor/

Tutorial of more than 1,100 exercises and summaries

http://www.humboldt.edu/~act/

"ARGUMENTATION AND CRITICAL THINKING

interactive tutorial site. The tutorials consist of a series of

tests to help reinforce your knowledge and understanding

of some basic concepts associated with making arguments

and thinking critically. It specifically focuses on the Classical

 Logical Stucture of Arguments and Informal Argumentative

 Fallacies."

 

More Teaching Critical

Thinking Methods

 

http://academic.udayton.edu/legaled/CTSkills/CTskills01.htm

Strategies for teaching Critical Thinking

http://www.austhink.org/critical/pages/teaching.html

The first pdf file entitld

 Teaching Critical Thinking: Lessons from Cognitive Science

============================================

http://pareonline.net/getvn.asp?v=4&n=3

Strategies for teaching Critical Thinking

http://www.darwinday.org/education/2002Workshop-criticalthinking.pdf

 

http://www.sbctc.ctc.edu/ewag/ewag0010/page9.html

Teaching and assessing Critical Thinking

 

http://www.class.uidaho.edu/crit_think/

University of Idaho Critical Thinking Handbook

 

http://www2.gsu.edu/~dschjb/wwwcrit.html

"This file briefly discusses (1) what is critical thinking,

(2) general principles for teaching students to achieve

 the critical thinking level, (3) achieving critical thinking

 through the interactive lecture, (4) effective cooperative

 group characteristics, (5) a literature review of the

effectiveness of cooperative groups, (6) the forming

and norming of cooperative groups, and (7) group

activities that encourage critical thinking."

 

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1249/is_1_73/ai_59176764/print

"It is a crazy business, summer camp. You spend nine

months planning for three, while trying to keep other

programs running at the same time. You seek to hire

the best staff you can find; then after a week or less

of orientation, you put them in positions of responsibility

asking them to do what no one else can - be a friend, parent,

counselor, and guardian all in one! It is impossible to teach

staff everything you want them to know in terms of content,

so shifting the emphasis to thinking skills may serve them better..."

 

http://college.hmco.com/instructors/ins_teachtech_foundations_module_critthink.html

"A learning module for instructors who would like to

 improve critical thinking through their teaching in an IT-supported environment.  Part of their "Teaching Foundations" series."

More Resources

 

http://www.tc.edu/centers/eft/

"The Education for Thinking Project examines the

development of thinking and learning skills as a goal

of education."  This site contains a series of short

"meditations" on thinking, knowledge, argument, etc.,

from one of the world's leading psychologists of

critical thinking."

 

http://wsuctproject.wsu.edu/

"Website for a fairly substantial effort to improve

critical thinking in teaching at Washington State. 

Based around a thoughtful and useful-looking

"rubric", i.e., a guide to rating critical thinking as

exhibited in a piece of written work.  Their efforts

apparently have been yielding "significant" gains

 in critical thinking."

 

http://www.umuc.edu/distance/odell/irahe/arc/4gen_ct.html

Resources on Assesement of CT

 

More about Assessment of

Critical Thinking

 

http://nces.ed.gov/npec/evaltests/

"The Sourcebook is an interactive version of Definitions

and Assessment Methods for Critical Thinking, Problem

Solving, and Writing, by Dr. T. Dary Erwin, Center

for Assessment and Research Studies, James Madison

University. It was written for the National Postsecondary

Education Cooperative (NPEC)."

 

http://www.csuchico.edu/phil/ct/ct_assess.htm

Critical Thinking

http://www.mcli.dist.maricopa.edu/dd/crit_think01/assessment.html

Assessment of  Critical Thinking

http://www.goshen.edu/~marvinpb/arted/tc.html#assessment

Critical Thinking

http://www.criticalthinking.org/aboutCT/CTquestionsAnswers.shtml

Important Critical Thinking site

 

The following are  articles in PDF format relating to

 the measurement of critical thinking skills and

dispositions using the California Critical Thinking Test:

 

http://www.insightassessment.com/pdf_files/what&why98.pdf

Critical Thinking assessment pdf file for downloading

http://www.homestead.com/peoplelearn/criticalthinking.html

Critical Thinking assessment pdf file for downloading

==========================================

http://tsa.ucles.org.uk/index.html

Includes samples of Critical Thinking Skills tests

http://cte.udel.edu/assessmentpmaki04j/infoliteracypmaki04j.doc

Information Literacy scoring rubric

http://cte.udel.edu/assessmentpmaki04j/quantreasonpmaki04j.doc

Quantitative reasoning scoring rubric

http://pages.towson.edu/assessment/what_is_critical_thinking.htm

Critical Thinking assessment